Blog Archives

Fun Cards: 1988 American League All-Star Outfielders

Henderson

Henderson

The top three vote-getters among American League outfielders were Rickey Henderson, Dave Winfield, and Jose Canseco.

Winfield

Winfield

Canseco went on to win the AL MVP Award on the strength of the first-ever 40 home run/40 stolen base season.

Canseco

Canseco

Coming in second for the MVP Award was Mike Greenwell, who believes he should be retroactively honored due to Canseco’s admitted steroid use.

Greenwell

Greenwell

Kirby Puckett rounds out (no pun intended) the AL outfield in 1988.

Was anyone snubbed? The players would have added Cleveland outfielder Joe Carter to the roster ahead of Henderson, but since the fans get to select the starters, Carter stayed home.

Puckett

Puckett

Advertisements

Fun Cards: 1988 National League All-Star Shortstops

Wizard of Oz

Wizard of Oz

Say what you will about the ’90s shortstop revolution, I’ll take the ’80s defensive wizards any day. Ozzie Smith was the no-brainer fan pick, starting his sixth straight All-Star Game; he would start the next four straight before passing the mantle to Barry Larkin. Lark would end up starting five ASGs in his career, and being on the roster for seven more. The other backup in 1988, Shawon Dunston, was only named to two All-Star teams in his career, but man he had a rocket for an arm.

Larkin

Larkin

The players poll showed that those who shared the field with the Wizard agreed wholeheartedly with the fans’ choice.

Dunston

Trammell

Fun Cards: 1988 American League All-Star Shortstops

Ripken

Ripken

Alan Trammell was elected by fans to start the 1988 All-Star Game at shortstop, but did not play due to injury. Cal Ripken Jr. was a fine second choice.

Stillwell

Stillwell

Kurt Stillwell returned to Riverfront Stadium for the first time since the Reds traded him to the Royals for Danny Jackson over the off-season. By all appearances, he enjoyed seeing Barry Larkin again. Stillwell was added to the All-Star roster as an injury replacement for Chicago’s Ozzie Guillen.

Trammell

Trammell

Here are the results of the USA Today players poll:

Guillen

Guillen

Fun Cards: 1988 National League All-Star Third Basemen

Bonilla

Bonilla

Bobby Bonilla seemed to be the heir apparent to Mike Schmidt as the regular NL third baseman, and was given the starting job in 1988. He did log six All-Star Games between 1988 and 1995, but no one today would dare claim that his career measured up to Schmidt’s. To be fair, no one’s career measured up to Schmidt’s. Bonilla’s backups, Vance Law and rookie Chris Sabo, couldn’t claim it either.

Law

Law

Again, the voters and players agreed on the starter, and the managers and players were not far apart on the bench. Here are the players picks for third base in 1988:

Sabo

Sabo

Fun Cards: 1988 American League All-Star Third Basemen

Boggs

Boggs

Wade Boggs was the starting third baseman for the American League, with Carney Lansford and Gary Gaetti on the bench. I posted the Lansford and Gaetti cards a couple of years ago when they were initially made, but I had not yet decided to make new versions of the All-Stars who had cards in the actual Topps set. After I finished everything else earlier this year, I decided to go back and update the actual All-Stars as well.

Lansford

Lansford

How did the actual roster compare with the players’ opinions? See for yourself; here are the players’ picks:

I find the inclusion of Bell on the list amusing since he didn’t even play in the American League in 1988. He lost his starting job to Chris Sabo during spring training and was traded to Houston in June. In 1988, the Astros were still a National League team (as they should be still).

Gaetti

Gaetti

Fun Cards: 2018 Stadium Club Lou Piniella

I posted a picture of Lou Piniella tossing second base on Twitter earlier tonight. That led to this response from Giants fan and friend Nick of the njwv blog

It was a great idea, and I couldn’t resist making a “fun card” (because I don’t expect Topps to ever do so, or MLB to even allow it if Topps wanted to).

Piniella

Sweet Lou managed the Reds at such a fun time during my teenage years. Chris Sabo, Eric Davis, Jose Rijo, Tom Browning, future Hall of Famer Barry Larkin, and so many more thrived under Piniella’s leadership.

We need Sweet Lou back in Cincinnati.

Fun Cards: 1988 National League All-Star Second Basemen

Sandberg

Sandberg

Ryne Sandberg was elected to start at second base for the National League, which was really no surprise. Robby Thompson of the San Francisco Giants was chosen to back him up, but did not get into the game (although Ryno didn’t play the full game).

Thompson

Thompson

The fans and players agreed on the starter here, as the future Hall of Famer was the clear choice for both. Here are the results of USA Today’s players poll:

Fun Cards: 1988 American League All-Star Second Basemen

Molitor

Molitor

Paul Molitor played second base for the Milwaukee Brewers on July 9, the Saturday before the All-Star Game, because he hadn’t played the position all year. He was on the ballot at 2B, but Jim Gantner was the primary second sacker for the Brew Crew.

Ray

Ray

Johnny Ray and Harold Reynolds were chosen as backups for Molitor. Both were the lone representatives from their teams at the All-Star Game. The players’ choices would have changed all three second basemen on the roster:

Reynolds

Reynolds

Fun Cards: 1988 National League All-Star First Basemen

Will the Thrill

Will the Thrill

Will Clark was the starting first baseman for the National League in 1987, with Andres Galarraga and Gerald Perry backing him up.

The Big Cat

The Big Cat

The players would have started The Big Cat by a slight margin over Will The Thrill. Perry was fifth in the players’ poll; he was the lone Atlanta representative on the NL roster.

Perry

Perry

Fun Cards: 1988 American League All-Star First Basemen

McGwire

Following his record-setting rookie campaign in 1987, Mark McGwire was voted by fans to start at first base in the 1988 All-Star Game in Cincinnati.

McGwire

On the bench were Don Mattingly, who the players thought should have been the starter, and future Hall of Famer George Brett, who had just made the switch to first from third in 1987.

Mattingly

Mattingly

USA Today surveyed the players in each league on who they thought should start the game. Players were only allowed to vote for their own league, and could not choose teammates. Results for American League first base were as follows:

Brett

Brett

The 1988 All-Star Game is special to me because it was held in Cincinnati. I started making these cards two years ago and finally finished the complete rosters (front and back, including managers) earlier this year. I plan to post them here over the next few weeks. Hope you enjoy!

Please note that these are NOT real cards. There are no physical copies and they are not for sale. They exist only in digital form.

%d bloggers like this: