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Fun cards: “Snubbed Baseball Immortals” Curt Schilling, Jeff Kent, Scott Rolen

If I was granted a ballot for the Hall of Fame, these are the only three players I would have voted for.

Curt Schilling will no longer appear on the BBWAA ballot. His fate is now in the hands of what used to be called the Veteran’s Committee.

Curt Schilling Hall of Fame Baseball Immortals

Jeff Kent holds the record for most home runs by a second baseman. He has one year left with the writers, but it is unlikely he will see the increase in support he needs for induction.

Jeff Kent Hall of Fame Baseball Immortals

Scott Rolen is one of the best third basemen to ever play the game. His percentage of the votes has increased every year, and he is almost certain to get the votes needed, if not in 2023, then the following year.

Scott Rolen Hall of Fame Baseball Immortals

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Fun Cards: SSPC “Baseball Immortals” David Ortiz

David Ortiz Hall of Fame

I don’t agree with this selection. I believe it smacks of hypocrisy. But, it is what it is. David Ortiz is a Hall of Famer.

Congratulations to the newest Hall of Famers!

Buck O’Neil, Bud Fowler, Gil Hodges, Jim Kaat, Minnie Minoso, and Tony Oliva!

Oneil

Fowler

Hodges

Kaat

Minoso

Oliva

Fun Cards: “Baseball Immortals” Larry Walker (Expos and Rockies variations)

Walker Expos

Congratulations to Larry Walker, who was named on 76.6% of the BBWAA ballots for the Hall of Fame.

Walker Rockies

Fun Cards: “Baseball Immortals” Derek Jeter

Jeter Baseball Immortals Hall of Fame

Congratulations to Yankees legend Derek Jeter, who was named on 99.7% of the BBWAA ballots for the Hall of Fame.

Fun Cards: “Baseball Immortals” Curt Schilling ***SNUBBED***

Schilling Snubbed

Curt Schilling failed to receive the requisite 75% for the Hall of Fame. He has two years remaining on the ballot, so induction seems inevitable…just not this year.

Fun Cards: 2020 Baseball Immortals Ted Simmons and Marvin Miller

I was excited about the “Modern Era” ballot. So many fantastic players, and I was looking forward to seeing some of these larger-than-life personalities get their just due in Cooperstown.

Then Ted Simmons and Marvin Miller were selected.

Both are solid choices, sure, but neither is particularly exciting. I’m still against the practice of putting non-players on the same ballot anyway, so I was opposed to Miller’s very inclusion on the ballot. Why should he (or any other non-playing person) take votes away from the guys on the field?

Oh well. Maybe Dale Murphy, Dave Parker, and Lou Whitaker will receive the support they deserve next time.

In the meantime, here are a couple of “Baseball Immortals” cards for the newest Hall of Famers…

Simmons

Miller

Fun Cards: “Baseball Immortals” Mariano Rivera

Mariano

Everyone knew Mariano Rivera would get the call today. The question was whether he would be elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame unanimously. No one had ever done it before—not Babe Ruth, not Mickey Mantle, not Ken Griffey. One writer stated earlier in the year that he would not vote for Rivera, then revealed he wouldn’t vote for anyone. However, he declined to submit his ballot, therefore Rivera still had a chance. As of late last night, according to the Ballot Tracker by Ryan Thibodaux, the all-time saves leader was still at 100%. Today, the question was finally answered. Mariano Rivera is the first unanimous selection to the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

Fun Cards: “Baseball Immortals” Mike Mussina

Mussina

Mike Mussina was one of the most dependable pitchers of his era, though he was never flashy. In 18 seasons, he collected 270 wins and struck out 2813 batters. He had six top-five finishes in Cy Young Award voting, and two additional sixth-place finishes. Is that enough for a Hall of Fame plaque? For five years, more than 25% of the voters have said no, but tonight he can start adding “HOF 2019” to his autograph.

Fun Cards: “Baseball Immortals” Roy Halladay

Halladay

A dominant force on the mound, the Blue Jays and Phillies relied on the late Roy Halladay to eat innings and win games. Halladay was the Cy Young Award winner twice, and finished in the top five for the trophy five other times. Eight times an All-Star, Halladay won 203 games and struck out 2117 batters in his 16-year career. The BBWAA recognized him as a Hall of Famer in his first year on the ballot, and he will be inducted this summer, less than two years after his untimely death.

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