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Random Awesomeness (part 2019.10)

Random Awesomeness

What I’m Reading Right Now: Supermarket by Bobby Hall.
 


Pre-order Down To The River by the Allman Betts Band!
 

Some hobbies are way too expensive

I love vinyl. I’ve picked up loads of used vinyl at record shops and antique stores in the Cincinnati area (where I live), Knoxville (a yearly trip), and Bowling Green (on my way to my son’s college). Generally I don’t spend more than $10 on a title, and that’s only if I really want the record and haven’t seen it elsewhere. For the most part, though, I like to stick with the bargain bins and keep most purchases under $5. I’ve found some great releases in those bargain bins, including The Guess Who, Merle Haggard, and Frank Sinatra.

Sometimes I click around on Amazon to see what some of my favorite albums would cost on vinyl, and it blows me away. In the same way that some baseball cards are ridiculously out of reach, I never expect to own any of these vinyl releases, as much as I would like to hear them in all their clicky-and-poppy glory.

Alice Cooper Van Halen

  • Alice Cooper, Along Came a Spider, $1396.48. The shock rocker’s best album since at least the late 1980s, maybe even since the glory days of the 1970s. Features a harmonica performance by Ozzy Osbourne and a killer guitar solo from Slash. Yet, I will never buy it at the current price (although, it does have free shipping!!!).
  • Van Halen, A Different Kind of Truth, $179.98. I was fortunate to find the first five original VH releases at reasonable prices, and received the remastered 1984 for my birthday last year. (Actually, come to think of it, the debut was a Christmas gift along with the turntable three years ago). ADKOT is another story. The record was panned by many, but I love how it reaches back into the vault and updates some old riffs that were used on demos in the 1970s. But at this price, I’ll have to stick to the shiny compact disc version.
  • Van Halen, Balance, $419.78. Sammy’s last full album with the band is the only Van Hagar production I really enjoy. “Can’t Stop Loving You,”Milli Vanilli “Don’t Tell Me (What Love Can Do),” “Feeling,” “Not Enough,” and “Take Me Back (Deja Vu)” all rank among my favorite Van Halen songs. I really hope I stumble across this in a bargain bin someday (or even for $10), because I’m not dropping four Benjamins and a Jackson regardless of how much I like it.
  • Cinderella, Still Climbing, $89.99. I was fortunate to find Cinderella’s debut, Night Songs, a few years ago for about $8, and I snatched it up immediately. Still Climbing, the band’s last album from 1994, has been more challenging to track down. It didn’t perform well on the charts or on radio as grunge had brainwashed everyone by the time it hit stores. The 21st century price tag is just a little out of my range.
  • Mill Vanilli, Girl You Know It’s True, $65.55. I can hear the groans. I don’t care if the guys in the picture didn’t actually sing the songs, they are still great pop songs. This is one of my go-to albums for “take me back to the easy breezy days of being a young teen in the late 1980s.” But at nearly seventy bucks? Nope.
  • Stone Temple Pilots, Core, $699.99. This album was huge in 1993, but by that time vinyl was on the outs. Everyone was listening to CDs or cassettes. I’m not sure if it was even released on vinyl in the 1990s. The “collectible” reissue from 2013 is currently going for $700. Insane.
  • Black Label Society, Mafia, $70.90. Zakk Wylde’s side-band has changed lineups frequently over the years, but with ten studio releases under the BLS moniker since 1999, it is a force to be reckoned with. My favorite album from Zakk and friends is 2005’s Mafia, which includes “In This River,” a touching song frequently dedicated in concert to Wylde’s best friend Dimebag Darrell of Pantera, who was killed in a shooting in 2004.

Some of these albums may get reissued, and hopefully I’ll be paying attention when that happens so I can buy them for about $20. In the meantime, I’ll just have to stick to my CDs and Amazon’s streaming service.

Cinderella Stone Temple Pilots Black Label Society

Talking Guitar by Jas Obrecht (2017)

Talking Guitar Jas Olbrecht

Talking Guitar: Conversations with Musicians
Who Shaped Twentieth-Century American Music

by Jas Obrecht
University of North Carolina Press, 2017

Guitarists love to hear other guitarists talk about their craft. Jas Olbrecht, former editor of Guitar Player magazine, has had the honor of speaking with some of the most famous guitarists in history from diverse genres, and a number of those interviews are collected in the volume Talking Guitar: Conversations with Musicians Who Shaped Twentieth-Century American Music. From the blues guitar of Clarence “Gatemouth” Brown to the rockabilly stylings of Ricky Nelson, the philosophy of the Grateful Dead’s Jerry Garcia to the two-handed tapping of Eddie Van Halen, Talking Guitar has a little bit for everyone.

The Van Halen interview is especially interesting as it was an unscheduled sit-down with the up-and-coming guitarist after Olbrecht was blown off by Pat Travers. After playing a game of one-on-one basketball and explaining his predicament, Van Halen said, “Why don’t you interview me? Nobody has ever wanted to interview me?” He introduced himself, Olbrecht started recording, and Eddie Van Halen’s “first major interview” was underway.

Johnny Winter went on record about open tuning and slide technique, Carlos Santana speaks to the importance of tone and emotion, while Tom Petty talks about understanding rhythm guitar and how important Mike Campbell’s lead work was so important in Petty’s success. Talking Guitar also features interviews with Nick Lucas, Ry Cooder, Barney Kessel, Roebuck “Pops” Staples, Carol Kaye, Stevie Ray Vaughan, James Gurley, Gregg Allman, Neil Young, Eric Johnson, Joe Satriani, and Ben Harper.

Also included is an audio CD that includes excerpts of the interviews, including Eddie Van Halen explaining how “Eruption” ended up on the debut Van Halen record, and James Gurley explaining how John Coltrane influenced psychedelic guitar.

Talking Guitar is a fascinating collection of interviews, highly recommended for aspiring rock stars.

Learn more about University of North Carolina Press.

Purchase Talking Guitar by Jas Obrecht.

Random Awesomeness (part 210)

Random Awesomeness

Purchase Ace Freheley – Origins Vol. 1

Random Awesomeness (part 208)

Random Awesomeness


Purchase Quiet Riot – Live At The US Festival 1983.

What do rockers really want?

We’ve all heard the story about Van Halen and the brown M&M’s. But have you ever heard David Lee Roth sing about it? Of course not. If you want to know what is in a rocker’s heart of hearts, you have to listen to what they sing. Here’s a rundown of ten of the deepest desires of rock legends…

Van Halen Rising by Greg Renoff (2015)

Van Halen Rising

Van Halen Rising
by Greg Renoff
ECW Press, 2015
380 pages

One of the greatest American hard rock bands, Van Halen’s showmanship and musicianship is unparalleled. In Van Halen Rising, author Greg Renoff travels back to the time before Eddie Van Halen’s “Eruption” inspired countless young men and women to pick up guitars and start shredding, to the early days of the Van Halen brothers and David Lee Roth in California. A band that was written off as having no commercial potential, they were, as the subtitle proclaims, the “southern California backyard party band that saved heavy metal.”

A meticulously researched book, Renoff quotes childhood friends of the band members who were able to recall those early days and describe the parties, and, more importantly, the music. Renoff examines the influence of bands like Ten Years After and Cactus on Eddie and Alex, the impact of various cultures on Roth, and how they were able to merge those different styles into a popular style all their own.

Such an extensive look at a band’s pre-fame days is rare. Renoff does a phenomenal job, and Van Halen fans all over the world will savor every word of Van Halen Rising.

Learn more about ECW Press.

Purchase Van Halen Rising by Greg Renoff.

Fun Cards: 1978 Topps “Rookie Rockers” Van Halen

The Night Owl raved last night about music trading cards. And he showed off some cards he received from a reader, some from the early 1990s and some from the late 1970s. I have a few music cards in my collection as well, but I don’t believe I own any of the early 1990s “Rock Cards” that Night Owl flaunted. While the card designs (if you want to call them designs) aren’t attractive, the subjects are perfect for headbangers. From Slaughter to Poison to Skid Row…I would have loved these cards back in the day.

Forget “back in the day.” I would love these cards today. Though I would hope they could hire a better graphic designer.

But what I would love even more is for Topps to do something like this…

1978 VAN HALEN

Van Halen’s first album was released in 1978, so I put the foursome’s mugshots on a 1978 Topps rookie card. This is the kind of set I would like to see, and maybe Topps can make it happen. Maybe they can sign some of my hair metal favorites to contracts and produces an Archives-style music trading card set. Members of Mötley Crüe on 1982-style cards, KISS on a 1974-style cards (like this), Winger on 1988-style cards. That’s a set I would collect.

How about it Topps?

JT’s Ultimate Mixtape: Extreme edition

Extreme

The city of Boston, Massachusetts, boasts quite an impressive list of bands originating from that area: Aerosmith, The Cars, Powerman 5000, and, of course, Boston. Another rock group originating in Massachusetts is Extreme, featuring singer Gary Cherone and guitarist Nuno Bettencourt.

Extreme achieved massive success in 1990 with the ballad “More Than Words,” but that song was not representative of the band’s sound. A mixture of hard rock, glam metal, and funk, the band has a strong fan base despite a small discography. After a hiatus during the mid-90s through the mid-00s, Extreme returned with a new studio album in 2008 and live album in 2010.

Cherone and Bettencourt still tour today, and are scheduled to perform at Bogart’s in Cincinnati next Tuesday. I’ve been listening to a lot of Extreme lately, and decided to resurrect an occasional series and take a stab at “JT’s Ultimate Mixtape: Extreme edition.”

The “Ultimate Mixtape” rules are pretty simple:

  • Every studio album must be represented by one and only one song.
  • That song does not have to be an official “single” released by the band to promote said album.
  • Compilation albums can be included, but only songs that are new, previously unreleased, or remixed of songs from prior albums are eligible for the list.
  • Live albums…I’ve softened my stance over time. Live albums are a great way to sneak additional songs into the mix.

Let’s get into it…here is “JT’s Ultimate Mixtape: Extreme edition”…

JT’s Ultimate Mixtape: Exteme edition

The second half of the disc (the “bonus tracks”) is devoted to Extreme members’ other projects.

Bonus Tracks:

Check out all of the “JT’s Ultimate Mixtape” posts here.

Learn more about Extreme.

Purchase Extreme music.

Offbeat cover songs

Cover songs are a dime a dozen, and most of them can be thrown away pretty easily. Either they are so poorly performed, pale in comparison to the original, or are so faithful to the original to make them unnecessary. But when done well, cover songs can be thrilling. Think about Jimi Hendrix covering Bob Dylan’s “All Along The Watchtower.” Completely different arrangement and delivery, making it almost unrecognizable but still unforgettable.

A good recent example is this Krokus song from the new album, Dirty Dynamite. Listen to it carefully…do you recognize it at all?

So who did Krokus cover? Who was the original artist for this song?

That’s the Beatles, folks. They took that classic pop song and turned it into a sticky sweet 1980s ballad, complete with a crying guitar solo. I absolutely love Krokus’ version of this song.

How about Reggie Watts’ version of “Panama”…which is really nothing like the Van Halen song at all, but still pretty interesting.

Have you ever thought, “I wonder what ‘Stairway To Heaven’ would sound like if it had been performed by the Doors instead of Led Zeppelin?” Wonder no more, my friends…

Alex Skolnick, guitarist for metal band Testament, also has a jazz band that covers heavy metal songs. Check out “War Pigs” below:

If jazz isn’t your thing, how about flamenco guitar? Benjamin Woods did an album called Flametal of cover songs, like Ozzy Osbourne’s “Bark At The Moon”…

One more for this post, and then we’ll turn it over to the comments section…The Byrds singing “Friday,” a song originally written and recorded but never released by Bob Dylan. The song was made popular a few years ago by Rebecca Black.

So now it’s up to you…tell me some of your favorite offbeat cover songs in the comments, with a YouTube link if you can find one!

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