Blog Archives

Fun Cards: 1988 American League All-Star Shortstops

Ripken

Ripken

Alan Trammell was elected by fans to start the 1988 All-Star Game at shortstop, but did not play due to injury. Cal Ripken Jr. was a fine second choice.

Stillwell

Stillwell

Kurt Stillwell returned to Riverfront Stadium for the first time since the Reds traded him to the Royals for Danny Jackson over the off-season. By all appearances, he enjoyed seeing Barry Larkin again. Stillwell was added to the All-Star roster as an injury replacement for Chicago’s Ozzie Guillen.

Trammell

Trammell

Here are the results of the USA Today players poll:

Guillen

Guillen

Advertisements

Random Awesomeness (part 2019.7)

Random Awesomeness

What I’m Reading Right Now: The Message of Psalms 73-150 by Michael Wilcock.
 


Purchase Living The Dream by Slash featuring Myles Kennedy and The Conspirators!
 

Fun Cards: 2019 TWJ Eddie Murray

Murray

Is Eddie Murray the most underrated Hall of Famer? 500 homers, 3000 hits, eight All-Star Games, five consecutive top-five finishes for the AL MVP. How is he so often forgotten when talking about the greats of the past 40 years?

Fun Cards: 2019 TWJ Vladimir Guerrero

Vladdy

You will never convince me that Vladimir Guerrero shouldn’t have an Expos cap on his Hall of Fame plaque.

Fun Cards: 2019 TWJ Lee Smith

Smith

It took far too long for Lee Smith to receive the honor of baseball immortality. After fifteen unsuccessful years on the BBWAA ballot and reaching 50% of the vote only once, the Veterans Committee finally recognized the greatness of the dominant reliever. He will be inducted into the Hall of Fame this summer with Harold Baines, Mariano Rivera, Edgar Martinez, Mike Mussina, and the late Roy Halladay.

Fun Cards: 2019 TWJ Luis Aparicio

Aparicio

Luis Aparicio was so good…

“How good was he?”

Luis Aparicio was so good he was selected to 13 All-Star teams in just 10 seasons! From 1959-1962, there were two All-Star Games each year. How glorious! Man, I wish they would bring back that tradition.

I love the All-Star Game. The 2019 Midsummer Classic will be held on July 9 in Cleveland, which is a mere four-ish hours from me…

I probably won’t go. I can’t go. It would be fiscally irresponsible. But man, how much fun would it be? We went to Cleveland for a regular season game last year, and despite the weather had a good time.

Fun Cards: 2019 TWJ Reggie Jackson

Jackson

Reggie Jackson was one of my first favorite baseball players. I didn’t start following baseball until the tail-end of his career, but I enjoyed hearing about his swagger. His 1988 Fleer card is one of my all-time favorites, and I just came into possession of his rookie card less than a year ago via a Twitter giveaway contest.

Fun Cards: 2019 TWJ Frank Robinson

Robinson

Frank Robinson was one of the greatest players to ever wear the Cincinnati Reds uniform. And the Baltimore Orioles uniform. And the Dodgers, Angels, and Indians uniforms. Though he never played for them, Robinson was one of the greatest to pull the Giants, Expos, and Nationals jerseys over his head. Ok, so the Expos and Nationals were button-ups, not pullovers, but you get the point. The guy was a legend.

One of his nicknames was “Pencils” due to his unusually scrawny knees. He was the Rookie of the Year in 1956, NL MVP in 1961, and AL MVP in 1966. He also took home the World Series MVP in 1966 when his Orioles swept the Dodgers. He was selected to the All-Star team in twelve seasons. In 1975, the Indians named Robby the first black manager in big league history. He managed all or part of 16 seasons for four franchises (five teams, if you want to separate the Expos from the Nationals). He was named the AL Manager of the Year in 1989 on the strength of the Orioles’ second-place finish.

Robinson was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1982 along with Hank Aaron, Happy Chandler, and Travis Jackson.

Fun Cards: “Baseball Immortals” Mike Mussina

Mussina

Mike Mussina was one of the most dependable pitchers of his era, though he was never flashy. In 18 seasons, he collected 270 wins and struck out 2813 batters. He had six top-five finishes in Cy Young Award voting, and two additional sixth-place finishes. Is that enough for a Hall of Fame plaque? For five years, more than 25% of the voters have said no, but tonight he can start adding “HOF 2019” to his autograph.

Baseball Immortals: “Fun Cards” Cal Ripken

Ripken

There was little doubt that 2007 would see two first-ballot Hall of Famers inducted; the question was who would get more votes. Cal Ripken edged out Tony Gwynn by five votes, both flying into Cooperstown their first year. Other first-timers on the ballot in 2007 included Mark McGwire, Harold Baines, Paul O’Neill, and Eric Davis.

%d bloggers like this: