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Fun Cards: 1988 American League All-Star Third Basemen

Boggs

Boggs

Wade Boggs was the starting third baseman for the American League, with Carney Lansford and Gary Gaetti on the bench. I posted the Lansford and Gaetti cards a couple of years ago when they were initially made, but I had not yet decided to make new versions of the All-Stars who had cards in the actual Topps set. After I finished everything else earlier this year, I decided to go back and update the actual All-Stars as well.

Lansford

Lansford

How did the actual roster compare with the players’ opinions? See for yourself; here are the players’ picks:

I find the inclusion of Bell on the list amusing since he didn’t even play in the American League in 1988. He lost his starting job to Chris Sabo during spring training and was traded to Houston in June. In 1988, the Astros were still a National League team (as they should be still).

Gaetti

Gaetti

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Fun Cards: 1988 National League All-Star Second Basemen

Sandberg

Sandberg

Ryne Sandberg was elected to start at second base for the National League, which was really no surprise. Robby Thompson of the San Francisco Giants was chosen to back him up, but did not get into the game (although Ryno didn’t play the full game).

Thompson

Thompson

The fans and players agreed on the starter here, as the future Hall of Famer was the clear choice for both. Here are the results of USA Today’s players poll:

Fun Cards: 1988 American League All-Star Second Basemen

Molitor

Molitor

Paul Molitor played second base for the Milwaukee Brewers on July 9, the Saturday before the All-Star Game, because he hadn’t played the position all year. He was on the ballot at 2B, but Jim Gantner was the primary second sacker for the Brew Crew.

Ray

Ray

Johnny Ray and Harold Reynolds were chosen as backups for Molitor. Both were the lone representatives from their teams at the All-Star Game. The players’ choices would have changed all three second basemen on the roster:

Reynolds

Reynolds

Fun Cards: 1988 National League All-Star First Basemen

Will the Thrill

Will the Thrill

Will Clark was the starting first baseman for the National League in 1987, with Andres Galarraga and Gerald Perry backing him up.

The Big Cat

The Big Cat

The players would have started The Big Cat by a slight margin over Will The Thrill. Perry was fifth in the players’ poll; he was the lone Atlanta representative on the NL roster.

Perry

Perry

Fun Cards: 1988 American League All-Star First Basemen

McGwire

Following his record-setting rookie campaign in 1987, Mark McGwire was voted by fans to start at first base in the 1988 All-Star Game in Cincinnati.

McGwire

On the bench were Don Mattingly, who the players thought should have been the starter, and future Hall of Famer George Brett, who had just made the switch to first from third in 1987.

Mattingly

Mattingly

USA Today surveyed the players in each league on who they thought should start the game. Players were only allowed to vote for their own league, and could not choose teammates. Results for American League first base were as follows:

Brett

Brett

The 1988 All-Star Game is special to me because it was held in Cincinnati. I started making these cards two years ago and finally finished the complete rosters (front and back, including managers) earlier this year. I plan to post them here over the next few weeks. Hope you enjoy!

Please note that these are NOT real cards. There are no physical copies and they are not for sale. They exist only in digital form.

Fun Cards: 1988 Topps Eddie Milner

On Monday, I said Leon Durham was the last Reds “fun card” from the 1988 roster. Guess what? I was wrong.

Milner

The late Eddie Milner was a 21st round draft pick for the Reds in 1976. He clawed his way to the major leagues, debuting in 1980. He only played a handful of games in 1980 and 1981, but by 1982 he was a mainstay on the roster. Sadly, Milner battled substance abuse during his time in the bigs. In 1987, Cincinnati traded the outfielder to the Giants for Frank Williams and a couple of minor leaguers. He only stayed in San Francisco for a year, and signed with the Reds again in 1988. He collected nine hits in 51 at-bats during his final big league season.

Milner

Is that it? Did I include everyone from the Reds 1988 roster? I think the only player left out is Pat Pacillo, who had a Reds card and was traded to the Expos with Tracy Jones, but never appeared in a big league game for Montreal. Since Topps didn’t make “Pro Debut” cards in 1988, I think I’m safe in excluding him from this series. Which means I’m done!

I love the 1988 design and intend to do more with it at some point. After all, there are always “Music Fun Cards” that can be made!

Fun Cards: 1988 Topps Pat Perry

Perry

Pat Perry came to the Reds in late 1987 for the infamous “player to be named later.” In this case, Scott Terry was the later-named baller. Perry was with the Reds for less than a season, however, as he was sent to the Cubs in exchange for Leon Durham.

Perry

And with that, I thought I was finished with the 1988 Reds roster. But I was wrong, once again. One final card (?) tomorrow…

Fun Cards: 1988 Topps Leon Durham

Durham

Leon “Bull” Durham was a popular player in Chicago. Twice an All-Star, once a Silver Slugger, but with Mark Grace’s arrival he became expendable (much like Buddy Bell when Chris Sabo burst on the scene in 1988). The Cubs decided to take the Bull to market, and got pitcher Pat Perry in return. He only played 21 games for the Reds in 1988, and in 1989 returned to St. Louis, where his career began in 1980.

Durham

This is the final 1988 Topps Reds card. But… not the final 1988 card. Come back tomorrow for one more…for now.

Fun Cards: 1988 Topps Bill Landrum

Landrum

After two years in Cincinnati, the Reds traded Bill Landrum to the Cubs in exchange for Luis Quinones. He only played seven games in 1988, and in 1989 found himself in Pittsburgh. Landrum returned to the Reds in his final big league season, 1993.

Landrum

Fun Cards: 1988 Topps Luis Quinones

Quinones

Luis Quinones came to the Reds via a trade with the Cubs for pitcher Bill Landrum. He stayed until signing with the Twins after the 1991 season.

Quinones

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