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I Remember You…or do I?

Does anyone remember the old “Memory” game? We love to reminisce about days gone by, recalling the good old days while looking at childhood photos…what year was that taken? Memory plays a big part in music as well. Metallica, “The Memory Remains.” The Ramones, “Do You Remember Rock ‘n’ Roll Radio?” Aerosmith, “Remember (Walking in the Sand).” And one of my all-time favorites: Skid Row, “I Remember You.”

When it comes to wantlists, how reliable is a 42-year old brain? I was in Pigeon Forge last week and stopped by The Dugout. Lots of graded cards (of no interest to me), overpriced wax boxes ($20 for 1988 Donruss? No thanks!), and new product in packs (didn’t even look at the prices because I really don’t care). I asked if he had any dime or quarter boxes…nope. He offered a few Reds boxes to look through, $1 and up a card or 6 for $5. I looked, and hesitantly picked out six cards. Did I need them? Let’s find out!

We’ll start with the newest first, because that is freshest in my mind.

2017 Stadium Club Billy Hamilton

Hamilton

Awesome photo, action shot, but do I need it? This card was all over the blogs and Twitter last year, so I know I’ve seen it before. But have I ever seen it in person? Is it already in one of my binders? Survey says: NEEDED IT! 1-for-1 so far…

2016 Topps Update Jay Bruce All-Star

Bruuuuuuuuuuce

I miss Jay Bruce. He was fun to watch and willing to do whatever the team needed to win games. A three-time All-Star for the Reds, and hopefully he will make a few more Midsummer Classics as a Mets outfielder. I like the guy. But do I need this card? YUP. 2-for-2. Awesome.

2013 Topps Allen & Ginter Johnny Cueto Across the Years

Cueto

Another former Reds player, another guy I hope has grand success in San Francisco (just not against the Reds). One of five Cincinnati hurlers to finish second in Cy Young Award voting. We’re getting into fuzzy memory territory here, but I don’t remember these “Across the Years” cards at all. Checking the wantlist…and I don’t have any of the six “Across the Years” cards featuring Reds players. So we’re now 3/3.

1989 Swell Joe Adcock

Adcock

I debated putting this card back, or informing the shop owner that I didn’t think he was wearing a Reds uniform. You see, the Cleveland Indians also utilized the wishbone “C” in their logo for a few years. More than a few years, actually. According to Chris Creamer’s Sports Logos Indians page, that wishbone was a part of the Indians’ identity from 1933-1941, and again from 1954-1972. Adcock played for the Tribe in 1963, and that small bit of the jersey logo looks to me like the tip of Chief Wahoo’s feather. But he played for the Reds from 1950-1952, and Cincinnati used blue in their color scheme during those years. I’m leaning toward Indians here, as this card isn’t even on my wantlists in the first place.

I don’t care. I’m counting it. 4/4. Not bad, but there are two more cards to go…

1966 Topps Dom Zanni

Zammi

I love this guy’s name, and I know I have a card or two of his. But do I have this one? Checking the wantlist…already had it. 4/5.

1965 Topps Jimmie Coker

Coker

The last of the six cards from the card shop, and I’m pretty sure I had this card, but I wasn’t positive, so I went for it. Checking my wantlist, and I’m so glad I didn’t trust my memory on this one…NEEDED IT. This is only my third 1965 Reds card, joining Jim O’Toole and Steve Boros. So the trip to The Dugout was a success, picking up five needs and only one double. Sweet!

Here are some reasons I don’t like Topps Heritage…

Topps posted a bunch of photos of 2014 Topps Heritage on their Facebook page yesterday. In general, I like Topps Heritage. But there are some things that I definitely don’t like.

Jeter

I like Derek Jeter. I don’t like that his card is a “high-numbered base card” in the 2014 Topps Heritage set. The same goes for Yasiel Puig, Miguel Cabrera, and Max Scherzer. Seriously, is there any reason to buy a pack if all of the superstars are in the high numbers?

SandbergI am glad that Heritage includes managers in the set. It’s neat to see Ryne Sandberg, Don Mattingly, John Farrell and other former big leaguers still involved in the game.

I don’t like that there are only seventeen managers who will get cards in the set. Where is Bryan Price? No, he never played major league baseball, and he has never had a baseball card. But he (and the other twelve non-card managers) still skippers a team and should have a card if seventeen other managers have a card.

PuigBack to Puig. He wasn’t an All-Star last year. Maybe he should have been, but he wasn’t. Maybe he will be this year, but we really don’t know yet.

I don’t like that Topps took it upon themselves to either correct last year’s manager or predict the future, whichever is the case here.

This isn’t the first time a non-All-Star has been called an All-Star by Topps. One of the most egregious examples is Tony Bernazard from the 1987 Topps set; Bernazard was not an All-Star in 1986, or 1987…or ever.

McCarver

First things first, I don’t like Tim McCarver. But this isn’t a post about Tim McCarver. This is a post about 2014 Topps Heritage. And I don’t like that they cut up a 1981 Fleer card and put it in a 2014 Topps set.

JacksonTopps used a Fleer product in their set.

Let that sink in.

First things first, I absolutely love Bo Jackson. He was one of the most exciting baseball players and one of the most exciting football players. He was an all-around athlete and was fascinating to watch. Jackson was born in 1962. His baseball career started in 1986 and ended in 1994. I don’t like that he is included in the 2014 Topps Heritage set, which is supposed to be an homage to the 1965 issue.

I like the concept of Topps Heritage. I don’t like the execution.

Fun Cards: 1965 Topps Herman Munster

Herman Munster baseball card

In 1965, Leo Durocher was hit on the head by a baseball that was hit from a park eight blocks away. The ball was launched by the resident of 1313 Mockingbird Lane: Herman Munster. Durocher was very excited and invited Herman to try out for the Dodgers. After the try-out, however, Dodgers owner Walter O’Malley declined to offer Herman a contract because it would cost too much to repair the stadium after each game, and the insurance premiums would go through the roof with him on the field.

When someone asks you, “Who is the greatest hitter of all-time?”, your answer should be, “Someone who never got the chance to play in the big leagues.” No, not Josh Gibson. Herman Munster was the man’s name.

“Herman The Rookie” aired on April 8, 1965. Purchase The Munsters: The Complete Series.

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