Fun Cards: 1982 Topps Ralph Hinkley, Mike Kelly, and Hayden Finch

Our third installment of Greatest American Hero “fun cards,” this time with 1982 Topps.

Hinkley

It’s the bottom of the ninth inning. Shorty Robinson has just been fired, with coach Manny Garcia delivering the news. While Robinson and Garcia yell at each other in the dugout, Ralph Hinkley slips into the game, pinch hitting for…

Kelly

Mike Kelly. I’m not sure that Kelly was an outfielder. His position is never identified in the episode. In any case, he relinquishes the bat to Hinkley. Two outs, the bases are loaded, and Hinkley faces off against…

Finch

Hayden Finch. Actually, his name might is probably something else. He is never identified in the episode. I’m not even sure who the actor is. He’s a pitcher for the Oakland Mets, and that’s all we really know about the mustachioed fireballer. He racks up three balls and two strikes against Hinkley, but that sixth pitch is nailed by our caped Californian. (The cape is hidden by the uniform, but it’s there.)

Announcer Don Drysdale‘s words tell the story best:

“It’s a high drive hit to straightaway center field. This ball hit well. It is going, going—it is gone into the upper deck! No, wait, the ball is flying out of the ballpark. It’s goin’ into the parking lot. I never saw a ball hit that far before. Hinkley knocked the cover off of the ball!”

With that walk-off homer, Hinkley won the National League pennant for the California Stars, and they were on their way to the World Series.

Okay, so the writers of The Greatest American Hero didn’t have a firm grasp on the ins and outs of the greatest American pastime, but they tried. It’s an entertaining show, and remains one of my favorites from my childhood. Now if Funko would just make a Ralph Hinkley Pop!

About JT

Christian. Husband. Dad. 911 dispatcher. Baseball fan. Horror nut. Music nerd. Bookworm. Time Magazine's 2006 Person of the Year.

Posted on May 17, 2018, in baseball, baseball cards, television and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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