A tragically short four-year career

Lyman Bostock

Lyman Bostock was a star on the rise when his life came to a screeching halt on September 23, 1978. The outfielder was shot and killed while sitting in a car at an intersection in Gary, Indiana. He was not the intended victim; the shooter was aiming for his estranged wife, who he thought was guilty of infidelity. The shooter was tried and found not guilty by reason of insanity. He was committed for psychiatric treatment, but was given a clean bill of mental health just seven months later and was released back into society. Indiana changed state insanity laws shortly thereafter, making it possible for an insane person to be found legally guilty and serve time in prison after psychiatric treatment.

Bostock was fourth in the American League in batting average in 1976, behind George Brett, Hal McRae, and Rod Carew. In 1977, he was bested only by his teammate and future Hall of Famer Carew, who hit at an amazing .388 clip. In his tragically short four-year career, Bostock hit .311 for the Minnesota Twins and California Angels.

[This is the fifty-third of a series of “pre-season” baseball cards published at TWJ cards on tumblr. At least one new virtual card is planned for each day from now until Opening Day. Follow TWJ cards on tumblr for more.]

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About JT

Preacher. Author. 911 dispatcher. Baseball fan. Horror nut. Music nerd. Bookworm. Time Magazine's 2006 Person of the Year.

Posted on February 15, 2015, in baseball, baseball cards and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. 3 Comments.

  1. I remember when Bostock was killed; I think it was my first encounter with an active player dying, and it just seemed unreal to me that one of these larger-than-life figures should suddenly be gone.

  2. I remember him being shot and killed, but not the details. And the guy was out after 7 months?! That’s a travesty.

    • There was also the time spent in jail during the trial. I can’t remember what the exact number was….maybe 30 months total after the incident that he was released. Whether 7 or 30, it was not long enough for murder.

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