Singing To A Bulldog by Anson Williams (2014)

Anson Williams memoir Singing to a Bulldog

Singing To A Bulldog
by Anson Williams
Reader’s Digest, 2014
176 pages

One of my favorite television shows as a child was Happy Days, so it was with great interest that I began reading Anson Williams’ memoir Singing To A Bulldog. Williams takes his readers through thirty life lessons taught to him by a co-worker at Leonard’s Department Store when he was only fifteen years old. Willie Turner was his name; each chapter begins with words that the uneducated janitor spoke to Williams, words that stuck with the young man who became Potsie Weber on the popular sitcom, words that encouraged him to stretch himself and become much more than just Potsie.

This is not a tell-all autobiography. Williams avoids any controversial stories that would embarrass Ron Howard, Henry Winkler, or his other co-stars, and it was a truly interesting read because of it. He had the utmost respect for his fellow actors, and speaks highly of them as he recounts his journey. Singing To A Bulldog is not a straight autobiography, but a collection of memories and events designed to teach lessons. Most chapters are only four or five pages long, so it makes for a quick read, and in many cases the anecdotes can be reworded and used as illustrations in your own writing or speeches.

Williams made the most of his opportunities, humbly giving credit to those who helped him along the way, from Willie Turner to Garry Marshall to Sammy Davis, Jr., Aaron Spelling to Dolly Parton to Shailene Woodley. Happy Days fans will get a kick out of Williams’ memories of getting the part of Potsie Weber, while all readers can learn from Williams’ life experiences in Hollywood that taught him to be a better person.

Learn more about Reader’s Digest Books.

Purchase Singing to a Bulldog by Anson Williams.

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About JT

Preacher. Author. 911 dispatcher. Baseball fan. Horror nut. Music nerd. Bookworm. Time Magazine's 2006 Person of the Year.

Posted on December 15, 2014, in books, reviews, television and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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