Who is the greatest left fielder of all-time?

Musial

Breaking the 300-point barrier is a milestone in this project. Only two infielders eclipsed this mark: Cal Ripken and Mike Schmidt. In left field, two more join that exclusive group, with Stan Musial (341.07) beating out Ted Williams (305.68) for the top spot. Carl Yastrzemski lands in the #3 spot with an equally impressive 291.24.

Yaz

The rest of the top ten consists of Rickey Henderson (258.67), Al Simmons (237.28), Jim Rice (215.39), Willie Stargell (213.66), Goose Goslin (212.29), Joe Medwick (212.06), and Billy Williams (208.43). Notice anything about that list? All have been inducted into the Hall of Fame. Despite the contention of many that Jim Rice does not belong in Cooperstown, he seems to fit right in with his peers in right field.

Raines

The first non-Hall of Famer in my list of left fielders is Bob Johnson (192.02) at #12, slightly ahead of the supposed second-best leadoff hitter of all-time, Tim Raines (#13, 191.61). Perhaps we are overrating Raines’ career a bit, giving him too much credit for being second-best when he truly pales in comparison to his contemporary Henderson?

Brock

I have long heard that Lou Brock was a big mistake, that the only reason he ever made the Hall of Fame was his 3000 hits (despite being such a prolific base stealer). When all the statistics are plugged into the spreadsheet, Brock ranks #16 behind Johnson, Raines, and George Foster (#14, 190.99). Now, I’m a huge Reds fan, and would love to see Foster get some more recognition for his career, but I don’t think it was a Hall of Fame career.

Dunn

Adam Dunn, who has an outside shot at 500 career homers (sitting at 406 as he enters his 13th season), falls dead last on my list of twenty-nine left fielders with a very low score of 131.37. Without a major surge, it is doubtful Dunn will ever have a plaque hanging in Cooperstown.

About JT

Christian. Husband. Dad. 911 dispatcher. Baseball fan. Horror nut. Music nerd. Bookworm. Time Magazine's 2006 Person of the Year.

Posted on April 1, 2013, in baseball, baseball cards and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 3 Comments.

  1. Yastrzemski? Now that’s funny. The biggest fraud in the Hall of Fame. 23 years. 32 doubles 3 triples 22 homers and 90 RBIs average per year to go along with his .285 batting average. OB% of .379 and SLG % of .462 for OPS of .841. Yaz belongs in the Conditioning Hall of Fame, as almost all his accomplishments are in simple cumulative numbers, as a result of his playing 23 years and 3308 games

    • Yaz a fraud because he was durable enough to have a long career and put up outstanding numbers? An MVP award, four top ten finishes, and 15 straight All-Star games beg to differ.

  2. Mike Friedman

    Yaz “hung on” to the detriment of his stats for one simple reason–he was still so damn good that his team kept him in the lineup despite his diminished offensive output. What scout wouldn’t want to sign just one player in his career as good as Yaz was his last five seasons?

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